Do You Know There Are Hidden Dangers In Your Pet’s Bowl?

 

Cat eating from a ceramic bowl
Cat eating from a ceramic bowl

 

Do You Know There Are Hidden Dangers In Your Pet’s Bowl?

Is Your Pet’s Bowl Toxic?

The bowls you choose for your pet’s food and water can be the difference between a toxic or non-toxic meal. The use of plastic containers and the dangers of plastic have long been a concern for humans. It only makes sense to extend those concerns to our pets. They’re at risk too.

The danger of chewing on a plastic bowl
The danger of chewing on a plastic bowl

The hidden dangers in plastic bowls.

Pet parents buy bowls for differing reasons, price, availability, function, and fashion. Savvy pet parents buy pet bowls based on how they can affect their pet’s health. They’re putting their health first and that’s a good thing.

 

So what are the best bowls to ensure your pet’s food and water is safe?

Plastic food bowls while cheap can be quite a haven for bacteria. They scratch and gouge and in time they hold bacteria. Regular washing cannot remove this bacteria. Some pets are allergic to plastic and cats can suffer from acne picked up from a plastic bowl laden with bacteria.

Plastics can leach BPA into your pet’s food. BPA is a synthetic estrogen used to harden polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resin. Studies prove that it can cause irreversible damage to humans. Which raises the question, what is it doing to our pets? BPA disrupts the endocrine system creating disorders, such as chromosomal and reproductive system abnormalities, impaired brain and neurological functions, cancer, cardiovascular system damage, adult-onset diabetes, early puberty, obesity, and resistance to chemotherapy.

Dog eating out of a ceramic bowl
Dog eating out of a stoneware bowl

What about ceramic, stoneware, or glass?

Some pet parents prefer the look of glass, ceramic, or stoneware pet food bowls.  They’re okay if they’re free of lead. Look for a label stating it’s a lead-free glaze safe for pets. These types of bowls clean well due to being non-porous. They’re far more attractive than the plastic ones. Once they become cracked or chipped, you have the expense of replacing them. Just like plastic those cracks and chips hold nasty bacteria. So weigh up the cost over time, you may want to opt for something more durable.

Stainless steel pet bowl
Stainless steel pet bowl

The Safest Bowls

We’re now left with the option of stainless steel. It’s the kind of material can you clean well. You can remove bacteria from a stainless steel bowl with hot hand washing or in your dishwasher. These types of bowls are durable and will not break so that’s an added bonus. Look for a rubber bottom so your pet doesn’t have to chase the bowl around the floor.

Summary

To summarize your options when it comes to the health of your pets, stainless steel bowls win paws down. Ceramic, glass, and stoneware come in second, with plastic coming in last as a poor choice. Just as you choose what’s best for your health, extend that to your pet’s health also. Our pets are worth all the effort since they add some much to our lives.

Look after their health just as you would your own
Look after their health just as you would your own

What type of bowls are you using? Have you switched bowls? Were you not aware of the dangers?

 

 

 

 

 

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